Friday, 27 April 2012

Spotty Dotty

I have a thing for squirrelling away plants in less obvious positions in the garden so that you rediscover them when you least expect. Two such creatures I found lurking this week were Podophyllum 'Kaleidoscope' and Podophyllum 'Spotty Dotty'

These Asian forest perennials have singular peltate or umbrella style leaves which arise from thick rhizomes. Producing shy burgundy flowers hiding beneath the foliage in Spring which yield berries later in the season. 

Theres something quite magical yet dangerous about them that fascinates me. Magical in that they could be used by any number of woodland creatures to shelter from Spring showers and dangerous with their variegated, toady, psychedelic skins, warning you not to touch.



19 comments:

  1. That is a lovely leaf and new to me. I love plants that look different from the ones everyone else has in their gardens.

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  2. Such special looking leaves. I am still considering if I like them or not ;-)! I love the polka dot leaves of the Lung worth. I have several varieties in my garden (pink, purple and white flowers). It's absolutely beautiful. The leaves look pretty in a small bouquet as well.

    Enjoy your weekend!

    Madelief

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  3. I've never saw such a plant!
    Cool!!!
    Markus

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  4. Paul: That is some awesome plant. You are right, so beautiful, but so dangerous looking. I've never heard of ita..Happy Weekend..Judy

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  5. Dear Paul,
    I love surprises (especially the ones you monitor yourself - always a success!) The leaves look impressing - and seem so big that one cannot touch them by chance, only with intent. You might wonder when your 'stats' in blogland rise to the top - I once published a post on fly agaric - still the bestseller (though only for purely botanical interested, I assume)

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  6. Really unusual, never heard of it before!

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  7. Hello Paul:
    As you say, the Podophyllum is a striking plant. Guaranteed, perhaps, to strike fear into the unsuspecting visitor who may hap upon it. It certainly has an appeal for us, as do all very large leaved plants for they do add a dramatic touch to the garden which makes a welcome change from the romantic, sugared almond pastels of other flowers

    In our gardening days [sadly, our garden is no longer] we had a penchant for Gunnera which held pride of position by a small natural pond within the confines of our garden. In the growing season, we could watch the leaves increase in size almost hourly and it looked as if it could consume small animals [or people for that matter] when fully grown. We loved it!

    We have been recommended to Follow your blog by our dear friend, Madelief, and we are delighted by what we have seen and read. We have signed ourselves as Followers believing that wreaths are definitely not just for Christmas!!!! We hope to welcome you to our blog at some point soon.

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  8. Hey Paul - They are kinda different :) That's why I am enjoying your blog so much: always the unexpected. Loi

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  9. What a beautiful plant- I love the spotty leaf! I bet your garden is lovely!!

    Vicki

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  10. Ooh I've never seen this before. Love it and the way you have written about such a stunning plant. We visited an amazing medieval house conversion here in Hastings that has a tiny courtyard garden. In containers they had giant hogweed growing. We had our toddler son with us and they did warn us but I just love when rules are broken and I love when people take risks, make a garden their own and have a sense of humour about it too. (There were no casualties on the open day).

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  11. Très belles plantes. La transparence des feuilles éclairées par le soleil est du plus bel effet.
    Merci pour ton passage sur LE CHEMIN DES GRANDS JARDINS.

    Roger

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  12. Love it! I LOVE woodland gardens, I have acres and acres of moss in every direction. These plants are wonderful! Are they perenial, or do you have to dig the rhizomes come fall? I did ELEPHANT EARS a few years BUT our Connecticut summers are too short to give them the time to grow to their MASSIVE SIZE... I always say I'll start them inside and transplant OUT but I haven't ""YET""!
    Love you setting, and the little critters do too...
    Have a wonderful week,
    Donna

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  13. I seem to suffer a similar affliction, I am afraid! but what a treat to rediscover a hidden treasure again. I found a croton that I thought I had lost under a myriad of fern fronds ~ happiness is! Your Spotty Dotty is de lovely! Especially the shape of the leaf.

    Veronica

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  14. These are just so unique, with their unusual umbrella shape! I would love to have a garden area lush with both unusual and the ordinary. Unfortunately, I am a container gardener and envy those who have lush yards, full of color and foliage. :-)

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  15. What an unusual plant. I had never heard of it before but thanks to you I find it fascinating. I love woodland type flora. Wonderful and unique!

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  16. I have never seen this Asian forest perennial before. The 'Spotty Dotty' does look like a toad and would make a very nice umbrella for a small woodland creature.

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