Saturday, 20 October 2012

Trumpet of Death Risotto!

A brown paper parcel containing a mysterious autumnal delight arrived at my door from France this week. Tied very simply with string and weighing very little, I opened it to find not a thing of great beauty but for what it lacked in looks, it certainly makes up for in it's earthy flavour.

Picked between August and November, Trompette de la mort or Trumpet of death mushrooms are so called because of the black, trumpet-shaped horns which emerge from the ground in clusters as if playing a fanfare from 'those' beneath the soil!

Perfectly edible but not to be confused with the Death Cap mushroom which is highly poisonous. Our mushrooms were picked by a well-practiced and knowledgable mycologist!


Also known as Black chanterelle or Horn of plenty, they are the perfect ingredient in October for a spooky Roast Pumpkin & Trompette de la Mort Risotto dressed with a little truffle oil.

Great to come home to when you've been out for hours on your broomstick!

Looking for more Ghoulish Fun? Come over and join us at the Shop or on Twitter

25 comments:

  1. HI Paul,
    Fascinating....and stunning plate with the pumpkin! Looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  2. OMG Paul - what an amazing combo here................my favorites, risotto, wild mushrooms and pumpkin, totally French, flavors to die for (well not quite!!). Mushrooms are always a wee bit scary - years ago an acquaintance used to ply me with his daily pickings from Autumn fields in Massachusetts...........sadly I just couldn't bring myself to eat them! As a child in Devon I would squelch through the wet fields with Mum, at dawn no less, before the dairy cows came out and trampled those lovely white capped pretties just popping up in the meadows.......then we rush home and saute for breakfast, lovely memories!

    Love how you cut the pumpkin, a pretty plating there!

    Thanks for the greetings - I'm feeling great again and leave for Venice today!
    Mary

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks delicious . . . Love the pumpkin touch . . . Creative with foods as well Paul . . .

    ReplyDelete
  4. How wonderful - the risotto looks fabulous. Enjoy the weekend!
    xo,
    Phyllis

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a delightful surprise to receive! I'm not a mushroom person myself so I steer clear of them all, but you certainly made your gift look "spooktalular"!
    JoAnn

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello Paul

    What a feast. I find mushrooms exciting and share memories, like Mary, above of waking at dawn and going to pick mushrooms and the feasts that followed. Like you, I love all mushrooms and would love to taste the trumpet of death variety.

    Have a wonderful weekend

    Helenx

    ReplyDelete
  7. A thing of Beauty. Bet it was delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can imagine they tasted delightful and earthy. We used to pick a certain mushroom in farm fields and cook them but I don't remember what they were now. {I might pick the poisonous ones by mistake today or I'd be very 'high'} :) They were delicious though.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Paul,

    Your risotto sounds delicious! It is one of my favourite autumn dishes, but unfortunately my family is not too keen on the 'wet rice' :-)

    Your trumpets sound scary. Glad to hear someone with 'knowledge' picked them for you.

    Have a good weekend!

    Madelief

    ReplyDelete
  10. I find that Chanterelles (they call them Pfifferlingen here in Germany) have a lovely silky texture when cooked. I wonder, do these Trompettes de la mort taste that way too? If they do then the risotto will have been super!
    Kirk

    ReplyDelete
  11. Paul, You're brave. It looks a bit scary to eat. Very fun to serve for a Halloween feast though! Your risotto looks delicious and beautiful. You must be quite the chef!

    Happy weekend!
    xo
    Kim

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hello Paul, oh my, those champignons de France look so delicious! I love champignons of all kinds. You certainly have great taste and like the good things, good food and perhaps good wine too.. You are too humble to end your post with broomsticks. Your post inspired me now to cook what I call my " French Omellete" with eggs, mushrooms and gruyere cheese. I learned that from Laduree's Omellete et frites dish. Thanks for your comment which is a great idea. I posted a reply. Have a wonderful weekend. :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have never heard of those...
    They do look delicious with the risotto..
    Were you the Chef???

    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

    ReplyDelete
  14. If my broomstick did not require an MOT I would fly over and join you for that delicious looking risotto Paul.
    I think that there is a hidden chef in you, the dish is so attractive and beautifully presented.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hello! I hope you are having a fabulous weekend and perhaps a few adventures!

    This looks delicious!

    Have a wonderful day!

    P.S. You should try the pumpkin blue cheese macaroni, it is fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Looks delicious :)
    and do not miss.....

    S
    A
    T
    U
    R
    D
    A
    Y

    S
    H
    O
    W

    O
    F
    F

    it is FUN :)
    WELCOME
    Håkan ( The Roseman)

    ReplyDelete
  17. What a very special gift, and you have used it in a dish I would like to share.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Risotto... certainly one of Italy's greatest contributions to the world of international cuisine. Nobody does it better! The most Italian of dishes, isn't it?

    I love the mushrooms you used to produce your lovely risotto (we call them "finferli" in Italian) I have a bag of them, dried, and I use them for risotto. A slightly smoky and interesting flavour.

    I love the photos, by the way! Very stylish!

    BUONA GIORNATA!

    ANNA

    ReplyDelete
  19. I don't go any further than delicious field mushrooms I'm afraid yours do look kind of scarey

    ReplyDelete
  20. Oh, yum!! I'm coming over as I don't have the patience to make risotto :)
    L-O-I

    ReplyDelete
  21. um Paul...I think this is what grows on our cow poop here..but I would eat them.

    There's a fungus amongus!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gina, you're probably onto something although I have it from a good source that my mushrooms were picked with a white glove from an ancient, magical, antibacterial, woodland in northern France free of cow poops!

      Delete
  22. I learn something new everyday. I've never heard of those mushrooms before, but the Risotto looks amazing! :)

    Have a wonderful weekend, Paul!

    ReplyDelete
  23. When you speak risotto-- you are calling my name!! This sounds fabulous-/ I think I'm a tad bit jealous!! Could you send some my way?
    Vicki

    ReplyDelete
  24. I always emailed this blog post page to all my contacts, as
    if like to read it then my contacts will too.
    Look into my page ways to make extra money online

    ReplyDelete