Saturday, 19 April 2014

Holboellia coriacea

I couldn't resist sharing a picture of a particularly fine and rarely seen Japanese strain of Holboellia coriacea, that we grow in the gardens of Magical Manor that has just come into flower this week. 

I have gardened in many different styles over the years, wandering from manicured Evergreens to pampered Exotics and all in between but beautifully perfumed, quirky or high altitude plants have always been at the top of my interest list.
The abundantly floriferous Holboellia coriacea fits the bill perfectly with its gorgeous flowers, heady perfume and rather strange sausage shaped edible fruits, that the squirrels go wild for. 


Its blooms have arrived just in time for me to sit underneath, to enjoy the Gardenia-like scent of this very special plant whilst enjoying some afternoon tea.

What kind of perfumed plants do you like to grow?

25 comments:

  1. Hi Paul,

    This plant is new to me. It looks really beautiful. It reminds me a bit of Edeweiss too, as the flowers look thick and the same sort of colour. Really pretty! I mostly have perfumed flowers in my garden, but I do have a Jasmine bush. I planted it two years ago, but unfortunately I did not have any flowers so far. I am keeping my fingers crossed for this year :-)

    Wishing you a Happy Easter!

    Madelief x

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    1. You are right, the flowers do have a very thick texture. I'd love to see a picture of your jasmine when it's in flower Madelief.
      Wishing you and the girls a wonderful Easter.
      Paul x

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  2. So lovely in the way that it has attached itself to the fence. We will have space for some climbers in our small courtyard, I will add this one to the list along with star jasmine and honeysuckle. Monrovia sells it here in the US. Happy spring gardening, Paul!

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    1. The plants at Monrovia are probably descendants collected by the great plant hunter Dan Hinkley. Word of warning though Cindy, it is a huge plant and once it gets going it will romp away!!!

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    2. Oh, I will remember that! We had Akebia on an arbor in the Ohio garden and it was a crazy climber too. Fun to use some of the less common varieties, just need to place them correctly... for certain! Thanks for sharing!

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  3. Hmmm, I can almost sniff that beautiful aroma. scracth, scratch....

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  4. Absolutely stunning! I am quite sure I would enjoy this immensely.
    Happy Easter!
    Phyllis

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    1. Happy Easter Phyllis. Hope you are having great weekend.

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  5. Stunning Paul. You are such a talented gardener. Your garden must be so full of beautiful flowers and smells so fragrant. We grow Lily of the valley, roses and lavender. Happy Easter Sweetie!

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    1. You can't beat the classics, your garden sounds absolutely divine. Happy Easter Pamela.

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  6. That is beautiful, I've never heard of, or seen that particular plant before! I'm still a sucker for English roses, oh, and lilacs!

    xo Kat

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    1. Scent is so important in a garden Kat. I screwed my nose up at roses many years ago but now grow a huge range that we cut throughout summer to enjoy inside too.

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  7. Paul these are exquisite. I even love the leaves! I don't know that I've seen them in these parts. My favorite flowers are the fragrant ones like star jasmine and tuberose and gardenias. Hope you got some sunny weather and enjoy your tea alfresco!
    x

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    1. Tuberose is one of my all time favourites and reminds me of Paris where I was first introduced to them as a cut flower. I have grown them in the conservatory and there is always a Diptyque Tubereuse candle knocking around somewhere in the house for when I need an instant hit:)

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  8. Dear Paul,
    I would like to smell it - looks a bit like orange blossoms (though I looked it up in my books - they have nothing in common).
    I love the smell of violets, of cloves - as in border carnations? - and, outside: lilac. Lily of the valley for a short time, iris (mmh!) - and, though I have never smelt them on a plant, I could wade in vanilla and cinnamon. And citrus, some sort of roses, ah - I could fill a whole page... and I filled my garden with more than a dozen old roses, their scent can make you swoon (almost).

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    1. There is a Nemesia that I grew several years ago that had a wonderful Vanilla scent that wafted through the garden.
      Akebia supposedly has a vanilla and chocolate scent but I don't get it on ours.
      I adore Lily of the Valley which I prefer to grow in large pots to move where it can be seen and appreciated more in Spring without having to control its boisterous growth habit.

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  9. Gosh Paul,
    I've not heard of this one. Definitely a plant to look out for. I love anything scented.
    Have a lovely day,
    Liz x

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    1. Hi Liz, if you can locate one growing somewhere it is an exquisite fragrance, Hope you are having a wonderful weekend.
      Paul x

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  10. It looks succulent! This is going on my future garden list. I love a good climber - does it climb?
    Di
    X

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    1. It LOVES to climb Di and will clear six meters easily. Its twining evergreen leaves look fantastic in the winter too.

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  11. LOVE IT!
    I just plucked a PEONY from the garden that has a faint perfumed scent………..
    My garden is planted with jasmine and roses…………284 roses at last count!I think I have added to that however.Although, many of the roses do not have a fragrance its still a beautiful site!PENNY ROYAL is my grass under foot which smells divine after each step and LEMON BALM everywhere!!!!XXX

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    1. Love your garden Contessa, I would be dancing barefoot across the PennyRoyal and Lemon Balm plucking roses as I went! X

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  12. Paul this is a stunning flower that I have never heard of! I am going to have to search for one and see if it will grow here in the South.

    I hope that you had a wonderful week and I wish you a relaxing weekend.

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    1. Its a biggie but a beauty. Have a fab weekend Elizabeth x

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