Wednesday, 14 May 2014

At Blooming Last

Five years in the making and at last the Winter’s Bark tree (or Drimys winterii) in our garden has graced us with flowers. Not just any old flower but gorgeous little pendulous bunches of powdery white blooms, hanging in the daintiest of fashions that swing and giggle in the slightest breeze.

Up until now, the plant had been a little Snoresville but I am told that with age its beauty improves no end. I should expect the flowering to multiply year on year producing great heavenly clouds of shimmying inflorescences and for its aromatic and medicinal bark to take on a rich mahogany tone.


Apparently, it was an infusion of this very bark that enabled Cook and Drake to remedy scurvy on their ocean voyages. Not that I am planning to embark on any nautical adventures on the high seas right now but I do like to pair up random nuggets of botanical trivia with many of the plants that we grow at Magical Manor.


For now, the dancing blooms are a welcome addition of fun to the late Spring garden before la grande saison de jardinage kicks off.  Hope you've got your hats and sunglasses ready, Summer is but a short hop, skip and jump away folks.

17 comments:

  1. It is a little thing of beauty - I too have had bountiful blossoms this year on things that appeared to be in 'Noddy-land' - I put it down to the mild wet winter followed by an early spring - magic!!!

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  2. Beautiful blooms Paul-- we get so excited when we are blessed with new blooms in our yard-- I totally understand your excitement!

    Love
    Vicki

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  3. Paul, I'm in love with gardening. Envisioning what it will become. So, this please me no end, seeing how you derive so much pleasure from it as well. Big hug, mi amor...

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  4. I think the strange weather we have had recently has played havoc in the garden - you know warm one minute and tipping it down the next. I know the weeds in ours are having a bumper crop!
    A super plant, thanks for sharing.
    Have a lovely week,
    Liz x

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  5. Is it not funny how long we wait on beauty? I bet you remember the very beginning and never thought you'd see this day...or maybe you did and that's why you appreciate it so much. so good to know you will never have scurvy

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  6. Ohh we like that! Such delicate and elegant looking blooms!

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  7. Giggling blooms and botanical trivia? Well, Magical Mr Paul, that is e-x-a-c-t--l-y why I come here! For the photographic pleasure and for the wonderful wordsmithery. You, my friend, are pure blog bliss.

    Wishing you a fabulous end of the week!
    Helena x

    Oh, and Number 41 says hello.

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  8. Well, hello, pretty thang! I need you for my white garden!! Thanks for sharing, Magic Mike. I mean, Magical Paul :)

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  9. Oh come on Paul, jump on one of those ocean liners and come see us across the pond!!!! You don't have to be concerned about scurvy - and you can come enjoy the gardens here. Perhaps not as pretty as England where you seem to have many more gorgeous plants to choose from such as this one you show, and the rain, and more rain, along with livable temps, and not usually scorching heat and a zillion mozzies ready to eat you alive. Oh darn, hear my deep sighs here, why did I ever leave - I was born to be an English gardener, not out here all sticky with bug spray, fighting off flying things, dragging hoses non-stop due to heat…….and now today when we will get rain, an entire drenching inch, along with winds and possible tornadoes!

    OK enough complaining - my jasmines are gorgeous - both white and yellow - more flowers than any past year, fragrance knocks your socks off when you step onto the front porch or side garden. Going out to sniff right now before I need a brollie and have to dig my wellies out of storage!

    Hugs and happy English gardening days.
    Mary

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    1. I am at very much at home with most of the bugs and critters I our garden, although mozzies are another thing. That super irritating singing right in your ear just before they bite is just so unnecessary at 2am. We had one year when we where plagued with them in Summer.
      Your Jasmines sound utterly divine Mary. I am thinking of placing some stepping stones in the borders because I am forever wading in to sniff certain flowers but there never seems to be space to get to the back, to get my nose in amongst the climbers!

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  10. Have you showed us MAGICAL MANOR in the BLOG?I for one would LOVE to see it!

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  11. Wow that is one gorgeous tree...I bet they would not grow in our climate...darn!!!

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  12. Looks like that's a beautiful sunshine in London. Wow, your blooms are looking so pretty and must be so fragrant too. Enjoy your gardening days Mr P!

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  13. Beautiful plant Paul. I love the little white flowers. So wonderful when a plant finally flourishes after a long time care-taking. I just put in a few that I hope will be long lived beauties in my yard too. Then we began having 100 degree days here so early, so I'm hoping they get through the first few weeks.. Can you send me a few clouds? Looking forward to your summer garden photos! xx Kim

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  14. It is beautiful and obviously worth the wait. I was never so patient in the garden. You might like a book I am reading, The Signature of All Things, fiction but botany and plant medicinals are the theme - so far very entertaining.
    xo,
    Phyllis

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    1. I'm so glad it flowered this year or it would have ended up for the chop;) Thank you for the book recommendation Phyllis I'll check it out.

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  15. Dear Paul,
    "but I am told that with age its beauty improves no end" - hope it is true for persons too - at the moment we are shock-frosted in Berlin, so beauty will keep well :-) Despite the cold the first roses open on our balcony , and for Monday they promise us 26°C,
    Waiting for a plant to flower: very worthy in your case! In our garden I offered them four years - and they always understood and acted accordingly.
    I will have to look up your beautiful (and useful - a William-Morris-plant!) Winter’s Bark tree in our Botanical garden - might not be there, because I can't imagine to have overlooked such a beauty.

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